How to be Enchanting: Top 3 Tips from Guy Kawasaki

If ever there were a man who practices what he preaches, it would be Guy Kawasaki. I was thrilled to experience Apple’s original chief evangelist while at the 2012 International BMA Conference. The conference was fabulous, the content it delivered was top notch and hearing Guy speak was the icing on the cake.

Author of the new book Enchantment, Guy reports that he has been in the business of enchantment since 1979. And I can back him up on this: Guy is as enchanting as they come. Not only does this thought leader have great proof and credibility, he knows how to captivate an audience with a story. Guy’s advice reminded me of some of the universal truths of what makes business (and human) relationships work. He emphasized the importance of the softer side of marketing: ultimately, people buy from people. I’ll tell you three reasons why (and what you can do about it).

1.    Be likable.
When you are genuinely friendly, you can make a genuine connection. Guy told a great story about how enchanting he found Sir Richard Branson, Founder of the Virgin Group, to be when the big shot got down on his knees and rubbed Guy’s feet. A colleague was just relating a story to me on this point. When she was leaving the office of a long-term client, he said to her, “You do great work. But the real reason I love to collaborate with you is that I always feel better when you leave my office.”

2.    Be trustworthy.
The point that really hit home for me here was that when you trust others first, they will trust you. Guy pointed to brands like amazon.com, zappos.com and Nordstrom that have earned loyalty and brand equity by leading with customer trust. One of the suggestions Guy made on this point was to always approach people seeking to help them accomplish their goals (rather than wondering what they can do for us.)

3.    Tell a story.
Stories are currency. They can create intrigue, make an emotional connection and offer proof of likability and trustworthiness. One of the great legends of Silicon Valley, according to Guy, is that Ebay was started because the founder’s girlfriend wanted to sell PEZ dispensers. This makes a huge company seem completely approachable and even personable—even if its true mission (to democratize commerce) is far more lofty. Why talk about 64 gigabytes, for example, when you could explain that an iPod holds 10,000 songs? When you talk the talk of your desired listener, you are far more likely to make a connection. (Want more ideas about making an impact with story? Check out my post Storytelling That Sells: Five Tips for B2B Demand Generation Marketers.)

Are you enchanted yet? I encourage you to experience all of Guy’s insights about enchantment. Click the link to listen to his hour-long presentation and review the slide deck. Then, get ready to change hearts, minds and actions.

Note: the recorded presentation was given at Stanford University. It is very similar to but not exactly the same as what we heard at the BMA Conference. I think it’s a great example of how a story can be customized to connect with each audience, as Guy (a Stanford alum) weaves quite a bit of Stanford insider jesting throughout his presentation.

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